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Human Elements

Watching A Star Die | Bites

Human Elements

Watching A Star Die | Bites

1m 30s

Emily Levesque studies the moment of mystery when a star dies — the millisecond when its bright light explodes into a supernova or collapses into a black hole. By peeking through high-powered telescopes and analyzing reams of data, Emily can go back in time to discover what happened in the universe millions of years ago.

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1m 30s

The Translator | Bites

Dr. Bonnie Baird is a translator of sorts. But the languages she decodes aren’t any we know. Instead she works with clients who roar, squeak and chirp.

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1m 30s

Elevating Indigenous Science | Bites

Ernesto Alvarado’s childhood was filled with fire. Growing up in Mexico’s Chihuahuan Desert he learned of its danger and its promise — how it could destroy, but also how it could grow the land.

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1m 30s

In Origami, Science Unfolds | Bites

JK Yang sees endless possibilities in a single sheet of paper. The Aeronautics & Astronautics professor uses origami as a creative way to design foldable structures.

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1m 30s

Watching A Star Die | Bites

Emily Levesque studies the moment of mystery when a star dies — the millisecond when its bright light explodes into a supernova or collapses into a black hole. By peeking through high-powered telescopes and analyzing reams of data, Emily can go back in time to discover what happened in the universe millions of years ago.

Play
1m 30s

Tracking Invisible Cats | Bites

What is it like to study an animal that is almost impossible to see? Wildlife biologist Lauren Satterfield leads us on an epic adventure by car, snowmobile and on foot through deep snow to track elusive mountain lions in the wilderness.

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0m 30s

Coming Soon | Human Elements

The world of science is full of facts and figures, but behind the study are the people, and in the end, it becomes a question not of how they do science — but why. Human Elements premieres February 2 at 7:48 p.m. Online soon.

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