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Hidden Barriers

Health Care's invisible minority | Bites

Hidden Barriers

Health Care's invisible minority | Bites

1m 30s

Asian Americans are perceived as the "model minority:" wealthier, better educated and healthier than other minority groups. But this preconception hides many health disparities, in some cases worse than those of any other racial group.

Play Clinical Trials, Uninformed Consent and Distrust | Bites

Medical research in the U.S. has a dark history, particularly when it comes to the Black community. This has led to many in communities of color to distrust the institution of medicine. Crosscut investigates what that means for research and treatment, and why representation matters when it comes to clinical studies.

Play Opening the Doors to Medical School | Bites

Diversity at U.S. medical schools has barely inched forward in the past 40 years, and underrepresented students still face countless barriers to getting a medical degree. Crosscut investigates the roadblocks to access, progress and what Washington schools are trying to do about it.

Play Medicine's Poor Reflection | Bites

In Washington state, as with much of the country, physician demographics don't reflect the communities they serve, which leads to worse outcomes for patients. Unfortunately, at the rate things are progressing, experts say we may never have a physician pool truly representative of the general population.

Play Health Care's invisible minority | Bites

Asian Americans are perceived as the "model minority:" wealthier, better educated and healthier than other minority groups. But this preconception hides many health disparities, in some cases worse than those of any other racial group.

Play Lost in Translation | Bites

Washington mandates language access services for patients who speak limited English, but lack of oversight means many fall through the cracks.

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