Play Elephants: Do Giant Brains Mean More Smarts?

African elephants are known to recognize groups of humans, to test electric fences with their tusks to avoid injury, and (of course) can remember paths to resources passed down to them decades earlier. But, can elephants cooperate to solve a puzzle? How good are they at understanding themselves and their place in the savannah? What does an elephant really know?

Play Baby Penguins Can Navigate Better than You

Penguins are fascinating creatures, not just because of their physical characteristics. They’re amazing at creating mental maps, can recognize each other’s calls, and hunt in a coordinated way. Penguins might not be the smartest animal on our list, but they’re pretty incredible in their own way.

Play Foxes: Dog Hardware, Cat Software

Foxes are described as “dog hardware running cat software.” These animals are incredible problem solvers, build extremely detailed mental maps of their environment, and can recognize individuals. Over the last 70 years, some foxes were selectively bred to be friendly to humans, and these descendants behave completely differently than their wild counterparts. What can we learn about IQ from them?

Play How Intelligent are Dogs, Really?

The humble dog has been adapting and evolving alongside humanity since before we learned agriculture and how to make our own tools. This long history means dogs are incredible at human-canine interaction but is there a downside to this all human-focused adaptation? Hosts Natalia Borrego and Trace Dominguez talk to Laurie Santos, Director of the Yale Cognition Center, to find out.

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