Play Becoming Helen Keller

Revisit the complex life and legacy of the author, advocate and human rights pioneer. Helen Keller, who was deaf and blind, used her celebrity and wit to champion rights for women, people with disabilities and people living in poverty.

Play Helen Keller studied socialism [Audio Description]

Helen Keller became interested in politics and read extensively on socialism. She began to write articles for The Call, a socialist paper in New York City. "It can't be unreasonable to ask of a society a fair chance for all. It can't be unreasonable to demand the protection of women and children and an honest wage for all," she said.

Play Helen Keller the suffragist

Helen Keller was a social activist and suffragist, lending her name to the labor movement and the women's movement. "This inferiority of woman is man-made," she said in a speech in 1916.

Play Keller's use of oral communication [Audio Description]

Alexander Graham Bell encouraged Helen Keller to practice oralism, where deaf people communicate through speech and lip-reading instead of sign language. "Oralism in general, I think, has a very oppressive quality to it, because what oralism is predicated on is the idea that the only way to communicate effectively is being able to speak," said disability rights advocate Rebecca Alexander.

Play Keller's use of oral communication

Alexander Graham Bell encouraged Helen Keller to practice oralism, where deaf people communicate through speech and lip-reading instead of sign language. "Oralism in general, I think, has a very oppressive quality to it, because what oralism is predicated on is the idea that the only way to communicate effectively is being able to speak," said disability rights advocate Rebecca Alexander.

Play Helen Keller studied socialism

Helen Keller became interested in politics and read extensively on socialism. She began to write articles for The Call, a socialist paper in New York City. "It can't be unreasonable to ask of a society a fair chance for all. It can't be unreasonable to demand the protection of women and children and an honest wage for all," she said.

Play The Importance of Better Latine Representation

Xolo Maridueña (actor, "Cobra Kai"), Gina Torres (actor and producer), Tanya Saracho (showrunner, "Vida"), and Ivana Rojas (actor, "Gentified") discuss the importance of Latine representation both in front of and behind the camera.

Play How Latine People are Excluded in the Media

"You can't be 20% of the population and be less than 1% of the stories. That's exclusion." Actor and director John Leguizamo and Felix Sanchez, co-founder of the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, discuss the "digital segregation" of Latine people in the media.

Play How Rita Moreno became a social activist

Rita Moreno's first foray into social justice was attending the March on Washington with Martin Luther King, Jr. "I was there when he uttered the 'I Have a Dream' speech," she said. She continued to be a conscious activist throughout her career, fighting for Latine and women's rights.

Play Rita Moreno: Just a Girl Who Decided to Go For It

Discover how Moreno defied her humble upbringing and racism to become one of a select group of Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Award winners. Explore her 70-year career with new interviews, clips of her iconic roles and scenes of the star on set today.

Play The two people Buddy Guy admires most as a musician

On a trip to Germany, Buddy Guy met some of his musical heroes, including John Lee Hooker and Big Mama Thornton. Meeting them was a huge achievement for Guy; he said, “I don't care if I ever get a chance to make a record or nothin'. I done met the people who I admired the most as a musician."

Play How blues legend Buddy Guy got his hands on his first guitar

Buddy Guy’s first guitar cost his father two dollars and only had two strings on it. He would go to sleep with it in his hand, walked around with it and played until his fingers almost bled. He taught himself his favorite John Lee Hooker song on that guitar.

Play Buddy Guy's Grammys

Buddy Guy discusses the gratitude he feels for winning multiple nine Grammys, including his first, which he won for his song "Damn Right I've Got the Blues."

Play Buddy Guy: The Blues Chase The Blues Away

Dive into the career of the legendary blues guitarist, a pioneer of Chicago’s West Side sound and major influence on rock titans like Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton. Featuring new performances and interviews with Carlos Santana and more.

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