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NOVA

The Science of Opioid Addiction and Treatment

NOVA

The Science of Opioid Addiction and Treatment

3m 8s

Opioids mimic the body's natural pain relievers, binding to receptor proteins in the brain and sometimes inducing euphoria.

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0m 28s

Can We Cool the Planet? Promo

As global temperatures rise, scientists are exploring solutions from planting trees to sucking carbon out of the air to geoengineering. But would they work? And what are the risks of engineering Earth's climate?

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0m 27s

Touching the Asteroid Promo

In October 2020, a NASA spacecraft called OSIRIS-REx attempts to reach out and grab a piece of an asteroid named Bennu to bring it back to Earth. The OSIRIS-REx team has just three chances to extend its spacecraft’s specialized arm, touch down for five seconds, and collect material from the surface of Bennu.

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3m 4s

How Medieval Parchment is Made

The last remaining master animal-skin parchment maker in the world demonstrates how paper was made in medieval Europe (and why it wasn’t for vegetarians).

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0m 26s

A to Z: How Writing Changed the World Promo

Just as handwritten records changed how societies work, the printing press transformed the spread of information, igniting the Industrial Revolution. How did technologies–from pen to paper to printing press—make it all possible?

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0m 27s

A to Z: The First Alphabet Preview

Writing shaped our world and the rise of human knowledge, from the trading of goods to tales of ancient goddesses and kings. Follow the evolution of the written word, from 4,000-year-old carvings in an Egyptian turquoise mine to modern-day alphabets.

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0m 27s

Secret Mind of Slime Preview

Scientists investigate the bizarre “intelligence” of slime molds, which appear to learn and make decisions—without a brain. These cunning, single-celled blobs can navigate mazes and create efficient networks. Can they also redefine cognition?

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2m 8s

Human Nature Sneak Peek

With an extraordinary new technology called CRISPR, we can now edit DNA—including human DNA. But how far should we go? Gene-editing promises to eliminate certain genetic disorders like sickle cell disease. But the applications quickly raise ethical questions. Is it wrong to engineer soldiers to feel no pain, or to resurrect an extinct species?

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3m 22s

Living with Sickle Cell Anemia

Gene-edited babies could be free of sickle cell anemia. David Sanchez, a teen with the disease, shares his thoughts on living with sickle cell—and a possible future without it.

Play
0m 28s

Human Nature Preview

With an extraordinary new technology called CRISPR, we can now edit DNA—including human DNA. But how far should we go? Gene-editing promises to eliminate certain genetic disorders like sickle cell disease. But the applications quickly raise ethical questions. Is it wrong to engineer soldiers to feel no pain, or to resurrect an extinct species?

Play
0m 27s

Nature's Fear Factor Preview

For animals in Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park, the normal balance of competition and predation was upended when a war wiped out the top predators. The remaining animals didn’t simply grow in numbers—they began behaving in unusual ways, veering outside their typical territories and feeding patterns.

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