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American Experience

Chapter 1 | George W. Bush, Part 2

American Experience

Chapter 1 | George W. Bush, Part 2

8m 56s

The life and presidency of George W. Bush, from his unorthodox road to the presidency to the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and the myriad of challenges he faced over his two terms, from the war in Iraq to the 2008 financial crisis.

Play Chapter 1 | American Oz

By 1900, when The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published, L. Frank Baum was 44 years old and had spent much of his life in restless pursuit of success.

Play Matilda Joslyn Gage

Matilda Joslyn Gage cofounded the National Woman Suffrage Association with Susan B. Anthony. Matilda’s daughter, Maud Gage married L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

Play Trailer | American Oz

By 1900, when The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published, L. Frank Baum was 44 years old and had spent much of his life in restless pursuit of success.

Play L. Frank Baum

L. Frank Baum was an American actor, businessman and writer. He published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900 that became a best-seller, a theater smash hit and a film classic.

Play Extended Trailer | American Oz

Explore the life and times of author L. Frank Baum, the creator of one of the most beloved, enduring and classic American narratives. By 1900, when The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published, Baum was 44 years old and had spent much of his life in restless pursuit of success.

Play Chapter 1 | The Blinding of Isaac Woodard

In 1946, Isaac Woodard, a Black army sergeant on his way home to South Carolina after serving in WWII, was pulled from a bus for arguing with the driver. The local chief of police savagely beat him, leaving him unconscious and permanently blind.

Play Judge Julius Waties Waring

Julius Waties Waring presided over the trial of a white police chief who brutally beat and blinded Black soldier Isaac Woodard in 1946. He became an unexpected civil rights champion with rulings on several pivotal cases in the 1940s.

Play Isaac Woodard

Isaac Woodard entered the military in 1942 and served in the 429th Port Battalion as a longshoreman. After the war, he was honorably discharged on February 12, 1946 and headed home.

Play Extended Trailer | Blinding of Isaac Woodard

In 1946, Isaac Woodard, a Black army sergeant on his way home to South Carolina after serving in WWII, was pulled from a bus for arguing with the driver. The local chief of police savagely beat him, leaving him unconscious and permanently blind.

Play Chapter 1 | Voice of Freedom

On Easter Sunday, 1939, contralto Marian Anderson stepped up to a microphone in front of the Lincoln Memorial. Inscribed on the walls of the monument behind her were the words “all men are created equal.”

Play Walter F. White

In 1930, Walter White took over as executive secretary of the NAACP. When the Daughters of the American Revolution barred Marian Anderson from singing at Constitution Hall. White had an inspiration that transcended the whole debate: a free, outdoor concert on the Lincoln Memorial steps.

Play The Voice of Marian Anderson

In 1925, 28-year-old Marian Anderson won a New York Philharmonic competition that drew national
attention. But most signing opportunities in the U.S. remained closed to Anderson because she was Black.

Play Extended Trailer | Voice of Freedom | American Experience

Hailed as a voice that “comes around once in a hundred years” by maestros in Europe and widely celebrated by both white and black audiences at home, Marian Anderson's fame hadn’t been enough to spare her from the indignities and outright violence of racism and segregation.

Play Trailer | Goin’ Back to T-Town | American Experience

The story of Greenwood, an extraordinary Black community in Tulsa, Oklahoma, that prospered during the 1920s and 30s despite rampant and hostile segregation. Torn apart in 1921 by one of the worst racially-motivated massacres in the nation’s history, the neighborhood rose from the ashes.

Play Chapter 1 | The Codebreaker

The fascinating story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst who helped lay the foundation for modern codebreaking today.

Play Trailer | The Codebreaker | American Experience

The story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst whose painstaking work to decode thousands of messages for the U.S. government would send infamous gangsters to prison in the 1920s and bring down a massive, near-invisible Nazi spy ring in WWII.

Play Extended Trailer | The Codebreaker | American Experience

The Codebreaker reveals the fascinating story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst whose painstaking work to decode thousands of messages for the U.S. government would send infamous gangsters to prison in the 1920s and bring down a massive, near-invisible Nazi spy ring in WWII.

Play William Friedman: Cryptologist

William F. Friedman married Elizebeth Friedman in 1917 and the two began a life of codebreaking for the U.S. Government. During WWI, they invented new methods of codebreaking and laid the foundation for modern cryptology.

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