Play News Wrap: GOP moves to oust Liz Cheney from House position

In our news wrap Wednesday, Republican leaders stepped up calls to oust Rep. Liz Cheney as the third highest ranking Republican in the House after she backed President Trump's second impeachment. A federal judge in Washington threw out a national moratorium on evicting renters during the pandemic. Police in San Francisco arrested a suspect in the latest of a series of attacks on Asian Americans.

Play How cultural forces at play in the 1970's influenced America

A new book argues the 1970's was a moment when TV, movies, and music all shifted into a new gear, changing the cultural landscape in ways that continue to today. Jeffrey Brown has a conversation with author Ron Brownstein about his book "Rock Me on the Water: 1974-The Year Los Angeles Transformed Movies, Music, Television, and Politics." This segment is part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS.

Play Why experts call the COVID-19 death benefit 'deeply flawed'

In the past few weeks, a new and large form of COVID-19 relief has opened in the U.S., with the federal government offering to pay for all or most of every funeral of those lost to the disease. Lisa Desjardins reports on the unprecedented scale of help, how the rollout has fared so far, and the questions it raises about the cost of grief in America.

Play Board member explains decision to keep Trump off Facebook

Four months after Facebook indefinitely suspended former President Donald Trump's account, the company's oversight board backed the initial decision to throw him off the platform at the time. But the board may have opened the door to allowing Trump back on this fall. John Samples, vice president of the Libertarian Cato Institute, is a member of the board and explains the decision to Stephanie Sy.

Play Pelosi says GOP in 'strong denial' about Jan. 6 riot

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joins Judy Woodruff to discuss President Biden's ambitious plans for American infrastructure and families, the price tag associated with them, the fate of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act in the Senate, and the investigation into, and fallout from, the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Play Bolsonaro faces criminal investigation over COVID response

Brazil formalized a criminal investigation last week into President Jair Bolsonaro’s response to the pandemic. It could lead to his impeachment. The country just passed 400,000 total fatalities so far, with no significant slowdown in sight. With support from the Sloan Foundation, special correspondent Simon Ostrovsky and producer Charles Lyons bring us the first of two reports.

Play Waiving vaccine patent rights may help end the pandemic

President Biden announced that the U.S. will support waiving patent rights for the COVID vaccines — a major move that follows a call domestically, and internationally, for America to provide much quicker and greater assistance to the rest of the world. William Brangham looks at the potential impact of this decision and the reaction to it with Madhavi Sunder of the Georgetown University Law Center.

Play Remembering the legend of dance, Jacques d'Amboise

We take a moment to look back at the career of dancer Jacques d’Amboise, who died Sunday at age 86 in his Manhattan home following complications from a stroke. His work with the New York City Ballet, on film and in public schools, brought dance to new heights.

Play Dr. Vivek Murthy on new US inoculation strategy

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, a key member of the president's team combating COVID-19, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss President Joe Biden's aims to vaccinate 70 percent of all U.S. adults with at least one dose by July 4, and how a focus on rural communities will help achieve that goal, and how the U.S. plans to distribute vaccines abroad.

Play Is the NRA's bankruptcy filing a way to escape regulation?

The surge of high-profile mass shootings in the U.S. are increasing calls for stronger action on gun violence, access to weapons and its limitations. When discussing gun control, people often point to the long reach and influence of the NRA, which filed for bankruptcy in January. But is it really struggling financially? Stephanie Sy explores the question with Bloomberg reporter Steven Church.

Play Looking back at a year of remote trials at the Supreme Court

Few institutions are as tradition-laden as the U.S. Supreme Court, but the pandemic brought changes. Justices dialed in to hear their final oral argument of the term Tuesday- a case about sentencing reductions for low-level crack-cocaine offenses. Their final call also falls on the one-year anniversary of the court's very first remote oral argument. John Yang reports on the big adjustment.

Play What Breonna Taylor's name is teaching US about Black lives

A year and a half after the police killing of Breonna Taylor during a raid of her home, no one has been charged in her death. Now her life, death, and the larger questions they raise about policing, and the value of Black lives in America, are being explored in a new exhibition in her hometown. Jeffrey Brown has the story for our ongoing arts and culture series, CANVAS.

Play News Wrap: Biden aims to vaccinate 70% of adults by July 4

In our news wrap Tuesday, the White House plans to distribute more COVID-19 shots to states where demand is higher as it aims to vaccinate 70 percent of U.S. adults with at least one dose by July 4. An elevated train track collapsed late Monday in Mexico City, killing at least 24 people. U.S. intelligence analysts warn that Afghan women will suffer greatly if the Taliban regains power.

Play Stacey Abrams on the challenge to keeping democracy healthy

There is a growing fight over voting access in the U.S. and Georgia is at the center of the conflict, with Democrat Stacey Abrams as a driving force behind change in the state. On Tuesday, Abrams was honored at the National Democratic Institute's Madeleine K. Albright Celebration for Women's Risk-Takers. She spoke to Amna Nawaz about the challenges of maintaining a healthy democracy.

Play Rising food insecurity is killing war-torn Yemen's children

Nearly seven years of war in Yemen have produced the world's most dire humanitarian catastrophe. Millions are starving and have little in the way of medical care. Special correspondent Jane Ferguson has spent years traveling in and out of the country. She reports from between the rebel-held capital, Sana'a, and the last government stronghold, Marib, where she witnessed the worst conditions yet.

Play Following Yemeni soldiers' battle against Iran-allied rebels

Three months ago, President Biden ended American military involvement in the war in Yemen and reversed President Trump's decision to designate the Houthis a terrorist organization. But soon after, as special correspondent Jane Ferguson reports, the Houthis launched an offensive east from the capital, Sana'a, towards the city of Marib, the last stronghold of Saudi-backed Yemeni government forces.

Play Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on support for Trump, vaccines

NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Lisa Desjardins to discuss the latest in politics, including President Biden's ambitious plans for American families, the status of the Republican party and its support for former President Trump, the fate of Democrats in upcoming elections, and the politicization of COVID-19 vaccines.

Play News Wrap: Mississippi begins clean up after tornadoes

In our news wrap Monday, people across Mississippi spent the day cleaning up after multiple tornadoes struck on Sunday. The daily average of new COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is below 50,000 for the first time since October. President Biden says the U.S. will admit 62,500 refugees through September. In Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Andrew Brown Jr.'s funeral led to fresh calls for police reform.

Play Understanding the new EPA rule on Hydrofluorocarbons

The EPA on Monday announced a new rule that targets a greenhouse gas that's common but probably not too familiar to many Americans: Hydrofluorocarbons. These gases are widely used in home and commercial refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pumps. John Yang discusses the rule with Kristen Taddonio, a senior climate and energy advisor at Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development.

Play How the US plans to reunite families separated at the border

The White House announced Monday it would reunite four families that U.S. officials separated at the southern border during Donald Trump's presidency. Over 5,500 children were taken from their parents to deter illegal immigration since July, 2017. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas joins Judy Woodruff to discuss the move, which he has called "Just the beginning."

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