Skip to main content

Become a KCTS 9 Passport member for just $5 a month to access thousands of hours of PBS programs and specials

Your donation supports an essential community service, is tax-deductible, and helps make the programs you depend on possible

Moyers & Company

Democrats Bow Down to Wall Street

Moyers & Company

Democrats Bow Down to Wall Street

24m 43s

Bill speaks with outspoken veteran journalist John R. MacArthur, president and publisher of Harper’s Magazine, about the problems with the Obama-backed Trans-Pacific Partnership being negotiated in secret and Hillary Clinton's possible presidential campaign.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
22m 27s

Facing Evil with Maya Angelou

In this second of two programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, Bill Moyers revisits a 1988 documentary in which he and Angelou attended a conference on “Facing Evil,” held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
22m 27s

Going Home with Maya Angelou

Over the years and on several occasions, Bill interviewed Maya Angelou, the legendary author who died in May. In this first of two programs celebrating her extraordinary life, Moyers revisits an episode from his 1982 series "Creativity" in which he and Angelou returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her childhood.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

John Lithgow on The Role of a Lifetime

As violent images on the front pages confront us daily, we’re surrounded by productions of Shakespeare’s King Lear, the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in chaos. Actor John Lithgow is playing him right now in The Public Theater's free Shakespeare in the Park production. He talks to Bill about what it’s like to perform the monumental role and its significance.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative

Politicians in Washington, DC, seem to have stopped talking - and listening - to their colleagues across the aisle. While Washington appears to have stopped their conversations, Bill decided to start a new one. This week he speaks with the American Enterprise Institute's president Arthur C. Brooks, whose political views in large measure differ from his own, on how to fight our widening inequality.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

The Crusade Against Reproductive Rights

Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court’s landmark decision establishing a woman’s right to an abortion, was issued 41 years ago. For decades, conservatives and the religious right have campaigned against it, and recently, their efforts are finding some success. Bill Moyers talks about the politics of reproductive freedom with Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

Is the Surpreme Court Out of Order?

The latest session of the US Supreme Court was especially contentious, with important decisions on the separation of church and state, organized labor, campaign finance reform, birth control and women's health splitting the court along its 5-4 conservative/liberal divide. Bill speaks with Linda Greenhouse, a NY Times columnist and Dahlia Lithwick and a senior editor at Slate, about the rulings.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

The Truth vs. DC's Propaganda Machine

As the exploding crisis in Iraq spotlights once again the tragic record of American policy in the Middle East, Bill speaks with investigative journalist Charles Lewis, whose new book, “935 Lies” details the many government falsehoods that have led us into the current nightmare. A complicit partner, he says, is a media intent on preserving the status quo and never offending the ruling elite.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

Chaos in Iraq

Bill speaks with combat veteran and historian Andrew Bacevich about the events unfolding in Iraq and what they say about America’s role in the world. Bacevich says we need to look at the real consequences of engaging in the Islamic world since 1980 to decide what to do next. "Is the region becoming more stable? Are we alleviating, reducing the prevalence of anti-Americanism?"

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

Too Big to Fail and Getting Bigger

In Washington, DC a bi-partisan effort is underway to chip away at the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, which is supposed to prevent the type of economic meltdown that brought the world to the brink in 2008. "It keeps being weakened and weakened," economist Anat Admati, co-author of the book, The Bankers’ New Clothes, says of the Dodd-Frank legislation. “We haven’t really gotten to the heart

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
22m 27s

Joseph E. Stiglitz: Let’s Stop Subsidizing Tax Dodgers

A new report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz suggests that paying our fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy. Stiglitz tells Bill that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to “an unlimited IRA for corporations,” some of them paying no taxes whatsoever.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

Facing the Truth: The Case for Reparations

Ta-Nehisi Coates, a senior editor at The Atlantic, speaks with Bill about his new cover story for the magazine, “The Case for Reparations." In it, Coates argues that we have to dig deeper into our past and the original sin of slavery, confronting the institutional racism that continues in our society. Coates says we need to examine our motives more intently and reconcile the moral debt and economi

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 43s

The War on Climate Scientists

While climate change is serious, corporations and even some governments seem recklessly determined to minimize or deny the reality of global warming, as well as undermine the authority of scientists. In the second part of his conversation with Bill, environmental activist David Suzuki says killing the messenger is a 50-year-old strategy ripped straight from big tobacco's playbook.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 42s

Time to Get Real on Climate Change

This week, as the White House issued a landmark report detailing the frightening effects of global warming on our country, Bill Moyers talks with a scientist who has sounded the alarm for decades. David Suzuki, host of the Canadian TV series, “The Nature of Things,” believes that the current situation is not hopeless but says, “Our politicians should be thrown in the slammer for willful blindness.

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 50s

Is Net Neutrality Dead?

For years, the government has upheld the principle of “Net neutrality,” the belief that everyone should have equal access to the web without preferential treatment. But now, Chairman of the FCC Tom Wheeler is circulating potential new rules that reportedly would put a price tag on climbing aboard the Internet. New York Times columnist David Carr and telecommunications policy expert Susan Crawford

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 50s

What the 1% Don't Want You to Know

Bill talks with economist Paul Krugman about a new book that's the talk of academia, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty. It shows that two-thirds of America's increase in income inequality over the past four decades results from steep raises given to the country's highest earners. Krugman says: "We’re becoming very much the kind of society we imagined we're nothing like."

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 50s

Fighting for the Four Freedoms

If you believe we desperately need a great surge of democracy in the face of fierce opposition from reactionary and corporate forces, then remembering the spirit of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who died 69 years ago this week, is in order. Historian Harvey J. Kaye talks about how FDR was able to mobilize Americans to create "the strongest and most prosperous country in human history."

Available to viewers in US and Canada
Play
24m 51s

All Work and No Pay

Did you know that the federal minimum wage for many workers in sit-down restaurants is only $2.13 an hour? Restaurants claim that tips make up the difference -- but tips are random and often meager. So much so that restaurant workers are twice as likely to be on public assistance. Bill speaks with activist Saru Jayaraman of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, about the group's fight for bette

Supported by
Vote 2020 Logo

Your news, your vote.

Get local election coverage, state-wide polling and more from Crosscut.