Play Maya and the Medicine Woman

Content rating: TV-PG

Loretta Bad Heart Bull is a Lakota medicine woman on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota. She welcomed Omaha tribal members Wehnona Stabler and her daughter Maya to her woman-only sweat lodge and later helped Maya overcome a serious illness with traditional healing.

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Content rating: TV-PG

She was America’s first Native doctor, breaking barriers of race and gender to heal her traumatized people. A century later, Native women from many tribes follow in her footsteps. How can they hope to mend wounds of body and spirit that history has created? And what have they learned about new ways of healing that can help us all?

Play Medical School or Marriage?

Content rating: TV-PG

In her letters home, Susan La Flesche describes her fascination with medical school, her enjoyment of the fine homes in Philadelphia, and her love for “the handsomest Indian I ever saw.” Author Joe Starita tells us she had to give him up because her white supporters wanted her to focus on her medical career.

Play The Legacy of America’s First Native Doctor

Content rating: TV-PG

As her daily journal testifies, Dr. Susan La Flesche Picotte responded tirelessly to the needs of her people for a healer, translator, advisor and friend. Before her death in 1915 she fulfilled her dream of building a hospital on the Omaha reservation, a place of healing open to everyone.

Play The Navajo Way of Healing

Content rating: TV-PG

In medical school, Lori overcomes her fear of a traditional Navajo taboo and performs her first autopsy. Later, she seeks help from the healers of her tribe to learn “what a surgical residency could not teach me. “I’m looking at the ceremonies and thinking it’s like the mind is a hard drive and you’re defragging it or you’re cleansing it and it’s able to run smoother."

Play Growing Up with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Content rating: TV-PG

When Dr. Lucy Reifel returned to her ancestral community on the Rosebud Reservation, babies were at high risk. Over time, she turned things around, and she did something far more personal. Dr. Reifel adopted Casey, born with severe fetal alcohol syndrome. Her daughter Emma describes growing up with Casey and tells us what he taught the whole family about patience, understanding and love.

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