Play The Sights and Sounds of the Yukon

Content rating: TV-PG

The Klondike region spans thousands of miles from Alaska across Canada’s Yukon Territory. The area is incredibly remote. In fact, Dawson City lies only three hundred miles from the arctic circle. The landscape is marked with mountain ranges, raging rivers, and seemingly endless wide-open spaces. This video expresses the pristine beauty and natural sounds of this unique part of North America.

Play The Photographers

Content rating: TV-PG

The lasting treasures of the Klondike gold rush are the remarkable photos taken at the time. The two most prolific photographers were Eric Hegg, and Frank La Roche. Hegg, a Swedish American, came to the Klondike to expand his photographic business. La Roche traveled to the Klondike along with the first wave of stampeders. He sold his prints and published an album entitled “Enroute to the Klondike”

Play The Cremation of Sam McGee

Content rating: TV-PG

Robert Service is the great Bard of the Klondike gold rush. Although he arrived to the Yukon in 1904, five years after the rush was over, his poems and ballads capture the spirit of the time like no other. Service’s most celebrated work is “The Creation of Sam McGee.” The work is brimming with humor and exquisite imagery. In this web video, Dawson City actress Sue Taylor recites the famous ballad.

Play The Palace Grand Theatre

Content rating: TV-PG

The jewel of Dawson City is the Palace Grand Theatre. Built by Arizona Charlie Meadows, a showman from the Wild West shows, it opened its doors in 1899. It had a short yet prosperous run during the gold rush showcasing popular performances of the time. In 1961, after years of neglect, the Canadian government restored the theatre. At present, the Palace Grand is a popular and lively cultural venue.

Play The Klondike Gold Rush Trailer

Content rating: TV-PG

The Klondike Gold Rush tells the legendary story of the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush. Over 100,000 people voyage to the far North intent on reaching the Canadian boom-town Dawson City and striking it rich. Historians and authors bring insight and perspective to the event that changed the lives of thousands. Present-day characters reveal that the frontier spirit is still alive in the Klondike.

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