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American Experience

Extended Trailer | The Codebreaker | American Experience

American Experience

Extended Trailer | The Codebreaker | American Experience

1m 25s

The Codebreaker reveals the fascinating story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst whose painstaking work to decode thousands of messages for the U.S. government would send infamous gangsters to prison in the 1920s and bring down a massive, near-invisible Nazi spy ring in WWII.

Play
9m 18s

Chapter 1 | Voice of Freedom

On Easter Sunday, 1939, contralto Marian Anderson stepped up to a microphone in front of the Lincoln Memorial. Inscribed on the walls of the monument behind her were the words “all men are created equal.”

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1m 18s

Walter F. White

In 1930, Walter White took over as executive secretary of the NAACP. When the Daughters of the American Revolution barred Marian Anderson from singing at Constitution Hall. White had an inspiration that transcended the whole debate: a free, outdoor concert on the Lincoln Memorial steps.

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1m 9s

The Voice of Marian Anderson

In 1925, 28-year-old Marian Anderson won a New York Philharmonic competition that drew national
attention. But most signing opportunities in the U.S. remained closed to Anderson because she was Black.

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1m 40s

Extended Trailer | Voice of Freedom | American Experience

Hailed as a voice that “comes around once in a hundred years” by maestros in Europe and widely celebrated by both white and black audiences at home, Marian Anderson's fame hadn’t been enough to spare her from the indignities and outright violence of racism and segregation.

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0m 30s

Trailer | Goin’ Back to T-Town | American Experience

The story of Greenwood, an extraordinary Black community in Tulsa, Oklahoma, that prospered during the 1920s and 30s despite rampant and hostile segregation. Torn apart in 1921 by one of the worst racially-motivated massacres in the nation’s history, the neighborhood rose from the ashes.

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7m 25s

Chapter 1 | The Codebreaker

The fascinating story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst who helped lay the foundation for modern codebreaking today.

Play
0m 30s

Trailer | The Codebreaker | American Experience

The story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst whose painstaking work to decode thousands of messages for the U.S. government would send infamous gangsters to prison in the 1920s and bring down a massive, near-invisible Nazi spy ring in WWII.

Play
1m 25s

Extended Trailer | The Codebreaker | American Experience

The Codebreaker reveals the fascinating story of Elizebeth Smith Friedman, the groundbreaking cryptanalyst whose painstaking work to decode thousands of messages for the U.S. government would send infamous gangsters to prison in the 1920s and bring down a massive, near-invisible Nazi spy ring in WWII.

Play
1m 14s

William Friedman: Cryptologist

William F. Friedman married Elizebeth Friedman in 1917 and the two began a life of codebreaking for the U.S. Government. During WWI, they invented new methods of codebreaking and laid the foundation for modern cryptology.

Play
1m 6s

Elizebeth Friedman: Cryptanalyst Pioneer

Elizebeth Smith Friedman was an American codebreaker from Indiana. During Prohibition, her decrypts and testimony brought down international drug rings and liquor smugglers. Friedman’s codebreaking in WWII enabled the US to win the “Battle of the Atlantic” and smash Nazi spy rings.

Play
1m 19s

Greenwood

In the early 1900s, a group of black businessmen purchased land in the northeast section of Tulsa, Oklahoma. They called their community Greenwood.

Play
8m 29s

Chapter 1 | Goin' Back To T-Town

The story of Greenwood, an extraordinary Black community in Tulsa, Oklahoma, that prospered during the 1920s and 30s despite rampant and hostile segregation.

Play
0m 30s

Trailer | The Vote, Part 2

Part Two examines the mounting dispute over strategy and tactics, and reveals how the pervasive racism of the time, particularly in the South, impacted women's fight for the vote.

Play
9m 35s

Chapter 1 | The Vote, Part 2

Part Two examines the mounting dispute over strategy and tactics, and reveals how the pervasive racism of the time, particularly in the South, impacted women's fight for the vote.

Play
13m 52s

The Race to Ratification

The women of New York came together like nowhere else to push for their state’s ratification of the 19th Amendment and win a pivotal victory in the long fight for women’s suffrage.

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10m 1s

The Ongoing Fight

Black women have long been at the forefront of the right to vote. Today, 100 years after the passage of the 19th Amendment and 55 years after the Voting Rights Act, their fight continues.

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1m 29s

The Early Suffragists

They were just some of the first generation of suffragists: Elizabeth C. Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Lucy Stone, Sojourner Truth, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Sarah Remond, Susan B. Anthony.

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